Power Variations #2 – Super Power

The bread and butter of any Double Wing(DW) attack is Super Power.  Traditional Super Power is the same as the standard power I described yesterday (play side down blocks, with a FB kick out, and a back side guard wrap) but the SUPER in super power comes from adding an additional puller/wrapper.  Now usually, DW teams use guard and tackle as pullers and have TE cut block to stop backside pursuit of the play.

We pull on super power a little bit differently, we pull the backside TE as the second puller/wrapper. This gives us a few advantages, we are pulling a faster, more athletic kid who can get to the hole quicker and has better feet to be able to redirect to pick up a LB.  It also lets us keep our back side tackle home with his usual protect b gap and hinge.  This means no new teaching for our back side tackle, in fact ours has no idea what the difference is between power and super power.  Keeping the backside tackle at home and upright is a more powerful block and I feel does a better job at sealing off the back side than the TE cut block.

It is key for the BS TE to get depth on his pull, and re enter the LOS square.  Ideally, when the guard gets through the hole he looks head up to outside, and the TE looks head up to inside.

Now we didn’t do this from a DW set, we did it from our base 21 personnel pro pistol set.

I Twins Right super power

Here is some video of us running super power.  Please excuse 2 of the clips, our camera guy started a little bit late so you miss the very beginning but you can see us pull both BSG and BSTE through the hole.

Coming tomorrow, 1 back power!

POWER Variations Series

Now that the season is over, I can get back to some real writing.

Power is my favorite scheme in football.  I am a huge fan of the standard play side down blocks, with a backside guard pull up to LB.

I am also a big fan of some variations a coach can use to help the run Power scheme in different ways.

This post will be the first in a series of some of the different ways I have taken Power and made slight tweaks to get a TON of mileage out of one play.

Today I will focus on your standard 2 back Power.
2 Back Power is what we install first, and requires a FB or H back to be the “kick out” guy.
The play side OL all block their inside gap (we can work doubles if the defensive front allows it).

Our FB is our kick out guy and is responsible for getting his head inside of the EMLOS.
Our back side guard will execute a “Skip pull” and work through the first open hole he sees play side to attack the play side inside LB.
The back side tackle executes a B gap hinge, stepping to secure B gap pressure, then working back to stop backside chase.

Here are a few examples of our standard 2 back power.

You can read a very in depth article of my blocking rules, how I teach the blocks, and videos of drill work for the Power Scheme as part of A Coaching Arsenal.
My entire chapter focuses on OL play in the Power Scheme.
Some more information on this iBook is available here and here.
Links to ENTIRE Power Series posts here:

Naked Concept

I want to share an awesome play action concept that was one of our best plays this past season.

Our Naked Bootleg Concept

I’ve run bootlegs before. We did some last season from a 100% 4 wide environment. At my alma mater we ran a lot of bootleg off of our criss cross action. This year I would say the Naked concept was cleaned up some because of the great work of Coach Grabowski..
If you haven’t picked up his ibook yet, do yourself a favor and get it. There’s a ton of information there that heavily influenced what we did offensively this year. We only scratched the surface this year, I plan to include more of his concepts this upcoming season.

The core components of the Naked concept

A vertical play side route… We used both the “K Route” (an inside stemmed corner) and a Go route. The K route is great because that inside stem helps sell the run action better to the Corner, thus opening up space behind him. We ended up going to a Go route at the end of the season because our K routes were getting sloppy and we weren’t getting deep enough.

A deep drag or out route… from a slot or a TE.

A backside post with a hard inside stem to not out run QB’s arm

A flat/DE control route – this route is the most important in my opinion. It is his job to control that back side DE… it is “Naked” meaning OL is full run flow the other way. He has to take an angle at the DE so DE thinks he will be blocked. This flat route runner can’t be in a hurry to get out on his route. If the DE is up the field, he will lose his route and block the DE so the QB can set up and throw elsewhere. This was something we struggled with. We need to do a better job of picking this DE up to avoid costly sacks.

The flat route can come from anywhere. Same side, across the formation, from an H back… even a TE.

From the 21 personnel offset pistol we used last year it would look like this

Naked to the TE side. TE in this case would run the deep out. We are trying to get 15 yards deep.

  Naked rt 2

Here we have Naked going away from the TE. He now has the drag, trying to get behind LBs and be at the other hash at 15.

Naked rt 1

Here’s some film with my horrible voice over. Only thing holding back my rap career is the fact that my voice isn’t deep enough.

One thing you will notice from the pistol is the mesh mechanics we used. I got this from Coach Grabowski as well. It is a reverse pivot, followed by 2 steps vertical, looking back at the RB, with open hand extended. This he feels, is the best way to sell the play action. We fooled a lot of defenses, and quite often our own coaching staff (if they didn’t hear the play call).
I am contemplating whether or not I want to keep the reverse out next season. I agree it sells the play action better, hides the ball well, but I felt at times, especially if it wasn’t a great snap, it slowed the RB and the timing of the play down a little bit.

I want to leave you with one last concept off of naked. I put this in late in the year, I really thought we would hit it for a big play but never did. It is a wheel concept. It’s drawn up below from Twins, with the TE and FB still doing the same assignments. The major difference is that I have the X running a deep post with the Z running a wheel route. I hoped the Corner would follow the Post, opening up a home run to our wheel route but the corners stayed very disciplined.

I am thinking it might be better to send X on a GO route to remove him from the picture, and hit the wheel route trailing him.

I think it definitely had big play potential, and I will continue to play with what route configuration works best for us on it.

Naked wheel

 

POWER game film

I have been an all 4 wide coach my entire time at my current school.  A number of factors contributed to us needing to make a change midway through the year.  We became a 21 personnel “pro style” offense.  A major play for us was the standard “Power” play.  Just wanted to share a few clips of us running power that I felt we executed decently.  You will notice the guards skip pulling, it is a technique I understand in clinic talks but I am not 100% sold on it.  They entered the hole square, which is the whole idea behind it. However I feel most kids can get to the hole quicker, and with more speed (and therefore momentum) with a standard pull.  I think I will experiment with both through spring ball and summer next year.
Well, enjoy a handful of POWER clips

 

Using Spread Concepts in a Pro Style Offense

I got the idea for today’s post from Internet celebrity @Lochness

I do not know if a combination of routes and reads can necessarily be defined as “for spread teams” or “for pro style teams”… to me they are just moving players and manipulating the defense.  But I decided to take some plays that are widely viewed as “spread” plays and break them down from an under center 21 personnel offense.  I drew up split backs because the RBs are balanced and I have some experience in a pro style splitback offense.  However these concepts could just as easily be used from any other 2 back formation… I do think it is easier for a FB to release if he is offset those extra couple yards than compared to being straight behind the QB.

Each of these plays is a part of most spread passing arsenals… they are the most popular plays I see being talked about by spread people.

I think each of them would work just as well in a 21 set and could be done off of straight drop or play action.

I am by no means an R4 expert but I will do my best to put the concepts into it’s terms.

1. Snag
Seriously, did you guys think I would write about anything else before bringing up Snag?  If you have followed my activity recently you have probably seen how enamored I am with the 3 man snag concepts and variable tags on the backside.  I just think it is a money concept.  In my mind it is just as potent in a pro set.
TE has the Corner route, this is our Rhythm.  The snag by Z is the Read.  The playside RB has a swing (or shoot) route to provide the Rush horizontal stretch on the #2 defender.  X route on the backside can be a quick slant or snag route as a base.  I have it drawn with a Dig tag to exploit middle LBs who want to cheat to the 3 man side.  The backside RB can be left in for protection or run a swing to the backside for a 2 man snag combination.

2.  A similar 3 man triangle concept… Stick!
This concept is essentially the same as Snag as it has the same reads for the QB, and attacks the same grass, it merely inverses who the deep route and the settle routes are and is a great way of getting the ball to the TE (or slot depending on formation) the ball quickly. Z has an outside release GO and is our Rhythm.  Y has the Stick and is our Read.  The Rb is again the Rush route on a flat/shoot/swing whichever you prefer for a horizontal stretch.  I have X drawn up on a slant for  the possibility of working that 1 on 1 matchup should you desire.

3. Spacing is a very popular quick game concept with many coaches.  There is no vertical stretch but we are able to put a lot of pressure on the defense to cover horizontally.  Y is our Rhythm and has the Spot/mini curl, Z is the Read with the Snag route (carry over teaching from Snag Concept) and again our RB provides the Rush with his flat/shoot/swing.  I drew it with the same X slant as above to work 1 on 1.
4.  Now on to a vertical stretch.  I love the horizontal stretches given by the plays above but a vertical stretch play is a necessity in my opinion.  The simple flood concept is easy out of a Pro Set.  This was our best concept when I was at my first coaching stop.  Z has a skinny post, I used to run this as a GO but I like the idea of running a Skinny post instead to occupy a safety lined up on the hash… keep him out of the picture of that out route. That skinny post is our Rhythm.  Y has a 12 yard out and is our Read.  RB is the Rush with another flat route.  Works great off of a play action half roll action with that RB setting up faking a lead block then leaking out.  Key is to work the timing in practice and keeping proper spacing between Y and the RB.  There needs to be vertical spacing (Y at 12, RB on an angle to 3 yards at the sideline) and Horizontal distance between them to increase the chances of hitting one of them.  Backside can run a post or dig route that we can capitalize on later in the game when we see an over reaction.

 

5.  Finally I want to touch on 4 verts.  So far everything I have drawn has involved the RB releasing on some sort of flat route from the backfield.  Verts is a great play that not many 2 back teams run, or can only run from one of their 1 back sets and somewhat give it away.  I think it is reasonable to be able to run it from a 2 back set with the right field spacing.  X and Z own the numbers.  Y has the right hash.. and ideally we run this play from the left hash or close to it so the RB can start his flat route and turn it up the hash… this route is very difficult to cover from a defense’s perspective.  It should fit in with our timing because the Y is our rhythm and always our first read… We want to zip that ball in to him as soon as he clears the OLB every time… then if we see that taken away by collision or FS jumping it we move to our Read… the left hash vertical (Rb from backfield). The Rush is the backside RB checking down.  Coaches can use tags to work reading an outside vert first if that is the match up you prefer.

My final note is that on any of these concepts with the Rb getting out… We can always tag “Wheel” to convert his route into a flat then up the sideline… this is a nice constraint off of his usual flat route and can hurt the defense that wants to jump his flat route.  Make sure any other deep route to that side is converted to a Post or Dig on this play so we don’t have 2 men running their routes into one another.  For example if we worked that 3 man snag with a “wheel” tag… Y would run a Dig… because a corner would put him and the RB (wheel) into each other’s way deep down the sideline.

A “Pro Style” approach to the spread offense

I was asked by a reader to talk about the use of a series based offense.  There has also been a lot of talk on coachhuey about series based offense, and using a series based approach within a spread offense.

I think being in spread puts more emphasis on thinning out the defense, making them defend the entire field and utilizing numbers and leverage to move the ball, but one can still use a series based approach to play the if/then game when a defender or defenders begin to “cheat” their responsibilities in order to make a stop.  Offense is all about putting defenders in conflict.

I started drawing up this little series of plays when this season ended.  I looked at how I used to do things out of 2 back under center, and the play action game we had a lot of success with.  I am normally a fan of staying as maximally spread out as possible, for example this past season 100% of our snaps were from 10 or empty personnel… no TE EVER, no 2 Back EVER.  The majority of the season we had a QB who wasn’t necessarily a great runner, looking back I think the added back or TE could have helped us since our QB didn’t really read BSDE and we didn’t run him very often.  Next year we have 2 QBs who can fly and will be more than capable of reading BSDE and designed QB runs.  However I have set up this little package as something that can be used without a running QB, year in, year out, regardless of talent.  Now if you get a kid who can run it and throw it, then it just opens up the options you have even more.

Please excuse the crude drawings… I’ve tried a bunch of different playbook software, but still find good old microsoft paint the easiest.

I base this series out of an Off-Set I look, just in the gun.  Y by our base alignment is our slot WR, he can be moved to either right or left side, or with the use of a “YO” tag he can come down to a TE position if we feel that will help us.  For this article’s sake , all of the drawings are with Y as a slot and H in the offset “full back” position.  Our “H” is our slot WR as well when we are in 1 back, this is a good fit for that “tweener” type of kid.

QB is at 4.5 yards, RB at 6, H even with the QB and aligned over B gap… might play with these alignments, but this is what I have seen a lot of teams do.
Every play in this 4 play series begins with the QB catching the snap and opening to the Left (counter clockwise) and with the RB stepping to the left of the QB.  That is what sets up the series based approach, the fact that the initial movement of the QB and F look the same on every play
1. Power
Standard Power G scheme to the Left.  Playside OL will down block or double to backside LB. FB kicks out DE, BSG skip pulls to playside ILB.  BST hinge blocks BSDE.  QB can sell dropback or boot action after he hands off to F.  If, let’s say, the defense aligns in 2 high look (4-3) then I would have the playside down/double to MLB, and BSG would skip pull to the LOLB.
Schematically, if my H can get a semi decent kickout block I should be OK, my playside OL has good angles and we account for every hat with the exception of the LOLB in the above look.  Now his alignment can vary depending on how the defense wishes to play it, but they have to give something up.  He may stay with a wide alignment to help that corner with our X WR underneath.  If talent is equal, I think my guys should be able to win those battles up front and we will get 4-5 yards a pop on POWER.  The only one who can really stop it is the LOLB.
That is the next part in the series, taking advantage of that LOLB when he wants to make the tackle on power. We can run a play action pass in to that LOLB and catch him cheating
#2 Flood Left
 If we slide pass pro the OL right, it looks just like the playside down blocks on Power.  H will attack DE and chip him as he slips into the flat. F fakes Power Left and runs right at that playside DE. (I could also have my OL just block man on if I was worried about the RB on the DE ) X Clears out, Y runs the deep crossing route, Z runs a backside post and we end up in a pretty standard Flood Concept to the playside.
I would probably semi roll the QB to it after he fakes, most times he will be able to hit the H in the flats right now, if the LOLB does recognize it as a pass and chases the H, the Y will likely come open when he gets all the way across.  I can also help my Y by using the YO tag which will bring him in so he doesn’t have as far to run to get across.
Now let’s say the inside LBs are really flowing hard to blow up Power, or we get secondary rotation to where our QB is opening we can hit them with Counter back to the strong side.
#3 Counter
coachhuey knows how much I love the counter scheme.  Doing it from this set allows us to block the backside DE, and by removing Y from the box we can remove a LB.
QB still opens up to the left, F steps Left like he is getting power, then plants and gets the hand off over the top of the QB to run counter Right.
Standard Counter Scheme up front, playside OL blocking down/doubling to backside LB, Center blocking back, BSG pull and Kick, BST pull up to LB.
Inserting H allows us to block the backside DE.
Now depending on the type of kid I had at Y, I could bring him down to a TE position, to widen the playside DE, he would down block on the PSILB, and the tackle would pull to that OLB who would likely condense with the Y condensing in YO.  Just depends on the kid I have there, how I would handle it.
Lastly when teams begin to jump the counter, we can hit them with another play action flood concept.
#4 Flood Right
Same concept that we had to the left.  Ol can man protect or slide it. H can chip DE on his way out to help the protection, F sells counter. QB can half roll to it if that makes it easier and we get our standard flood to the playside.  Again, I can mix in the YO tag if I want.
These 4 plays(really only 3) are simple, effective and can yield a lot of mileage.  They are good under center and in the gun.  I could easily seeing us install this package, plus 4 verts and do nothing but work that for the first week of spring ball.
Looking Beyond these 4 plays
While I think this is a pretty good start to an offense, I do not think that it is enough by itself to beat a good team.  These are some ideas I have just glancing at the formation.
Screen Game, all of our screen game exists still, really with little to no changes.  We can fake run and throw screen to either direction, this would especially be good if we get soft corner over X and the OLB wants to crowd into the box to play run.
We can use an OZ scheme and run stretch, or just pitch the ball to F going to the H side (Left in the above diagrams). H would lead block on the OLB, OL just uses OZ to seal the edge.
I have seen teams run sweep (OZ) with H going to the right, and having F lead block around he edge for him… one could use this or the inverted veer Dash concept with H has the one getting the ball.  F would lead block to the Right in either case, H would come across the QB as he is reading the Right DE, OL uses the Power G scheme that they already have a ton of reps in because Power G was the first play installed in the series.
We are already in a 7 man protection, we could run the outside WRs on anything we want deep to exploit a 1 on 1 match up with the corner and we can use Y to control the middle with a search route.
I can go ISO either way very easily.
If I wanted to get into a triple option look, I can use H as the dive on veer, or have him run zone and read BSDE… with F stepping around running pitch relation.  I could run a loaded speed option quite easily.
I could easily get in to the air raid staples of mesh, shallow, stick etc. (they started from 2 back offense anyway)
Heck I’d still probably be able to get H up the Hash and run 4 verts from this set.
These are just some examples of simple things that could be done from this formation beyond the 4 play series I started with.  If I wanted to include more QB runs because he was a kid I wanted to feed there are a number of ways I can do so.  Naked QB runs after fakes to F, I can run follow plays with the QB to really try to overload a defense by having H and F lead block for QB.
Again I can use the option plays mentioned above (dash,veer,zone triple,speed option)
Now of course everything I mentioned would probably be TOO MUCH offense to ever get really good at something, but a few of those ideas can be picked out, added to the 4 play series I started with and then you have an entire offense that can stretch the field in any direction as well as put defenders in conflict.
One other benefit is in short yardage or goal line…Many people feel spread can not work in short yardage situations… I do not agree with this, but say for some reason (weather, injury to Center) I did not want to be in the gun, I could pretty easily go under center and run this series pretty much the same way, I would just need a little bit of work with the QB on the footwork, because in Gun he just catches and turns.
Being an OC in HS is all about putting the 17 year old kids on defense in conflict, so much internal conflict and sadness that after the game they turn Emo…