How to Download Video, Create Cut Ups, and Analyze with Hudl Technique

I have to give Todd Greenwell credit for inspiring me to write this post.  I saw some great analysis/breakdown he was posting and asked him to explain how he was getting his video, trimming it, and analyzing it both with telestrations and voice over.  He explained what he did and I began looking in to easy ways to download videos from YouTube as well as trim them down into smaller clips.

Below is a screen recording I did that shows you step by step

  1. how to download a youtube video you want
  2. how to trim the clip into the individual plays you want

 

Using HUDL TECHNIQUE for further analysis

hudl technique

The newest thing I have started using this off season is Hudl Technique.  It is a mobile app that Hudl offers (was another slow mo recording app that Hudl bought out).  I have been using it this off season to film kids in the weight room, and break down in slow motion their lifts to help them improve their form.

Coach Greenwell recently opened my eyes to the film analysis possible with Hudl Technique.  Once you have the clip(s) you want you can load them to your iPad/mobile device camera.  You can do this through the computer or I sent my plays from my MacBook to my iPad using AirDrop.

Once you have the video you want on your device (in my case my iPad) open the Hudl Technique app.

  1. Click Record
  2. Click Import
  3. Select the video you want to analyze
  4. It will appear in your videos.  Now simply click play on the clip and it will go to full screen.

From here you will have the ability to draw on the video using different drawing tools, and at the top of the screen you will see a microphone icon.  In the pic below you will see a screen shot of this exact part.  A red arrow points out the microphone icon, a yellow arrow points out the drawing tools (if drawing tools do not appear click the pencil icon and they will appear).

IMG_4520

Now you can really get in depth and not just analyze a play in slow motion (varying speed control in bottom left corner of playback screen) but you can draw in different colors over the top of your video using the drawing tools.  If you want to share your work with others (your staff, coaching friends, your players, or write for a blog like myself) you will hit the microphone icon on top.  Pressing this microphone icon will began a screen recording that will also pick up audio.  Now you can provide voice over as you go through the clip at whatever speed you want, adding in whatever drawing you want, and replaying it as many times as you want.  Once you are done, press the microphone again to stop the recording and you have a new video saved that you can export to share in any way you like.

This is a great way for coaches to integrate technology into their teaching.

You can now easily create video teaching tools for your players/staff with your audio/feedback over the video plus the ability to annotate on screen.  This is great for drawing blocking schemes, coverages, and highlight players to read on runs, passes, and RPOs.

Getting WRs involved in the Run Game

WRs by nature are usually the guy(s) you want with the ball in their hands.  Speed, moves, and the ability to break a long play any time they get their hands on the ball.  The problem, is that it can be difficult to get them the ball consistently in the passing game.  You see this even at the NFL and College level where a stud WR gets held to a rather pedestrian day.  I am  a big believer in using WRs in the run game for a few reasons

  1. It guarantees they are getting the ball in their hands, more touches = more chances to pop an explosive play
  2. Gives the ball to someone else so teams can’t just attack the tail back
  3. Adds a level of deception to our offense, which many coaches feel you lack being in the gun/pistol (we will run these WR plays as well as fake to them )
  4. Motion or a unique formation presents one more element for the defense to prepare for
The 2 concepts I will talk about today are
Jet Sweep
WR sweep
In the Jet sweep, we are bringing a WR in motion, timing the snap to hit him close to full speed and trying to get to the edge.  We use OZ blocking with the OL, and we use the FB and RB to kick out force and lead up for the Jet WR.
The first 2 clips below show our regular motion jet sweep.  The final clip shows a no motion jet sweep, where we experimented with a quick touch pass to the WR (no risk of fumble, technically a pass).  Up front I am fine with a little bit of penetration as long as we can get our hips around to seal off the box.  We need to improve how we coach our FB and RB to kick out force and lead through, but we felt we got a lot of bang for our buck, in terms of production vs practice time invested.
In the WR sweep, I wanted another way to get our WR the ball, that didn’t use motion.  As we started having success using jet sweeps, defenses started attacking the motion hard.  We used a Wing position to bring our WR closer to the ball.  You could accomplish this by using a slow motion or orbit motion as well.
The WR sweep differs from the Jet in a few ways
  1. We block it using pin and pull
  2. We fake to our RB  first and he blocks backside like traditional bucksweep
  3. Because of the blocking scheme, and the time it takes for the mesh, the play will typically get cut up into the alley, rather than attack the perimeter fast like jet
A great way to pair this if you wanted to keep the motion, would be to use a motion crack and run the ball, then motion, snap the ball with same timing, fake the run to the crack side, and have motion man bend around QB to get the WR sweep.
Using these WR sweeps is a great way to get your playmakers the ball.

COUNTER – The Ying to Power’s Yang

I can not imagine running Power without running Counter.  The two plays go together  very well and the cutback action of counter will hurt defenses who flow very fast to the RB’s initial path.  It is also a great answer to teams who want to load up to your FB  or strong side in an effort to shut down Power.

We run multiple variations of Counter.  The core of the play is down blocks and/or double teams play side, just like Power.  This is why I think counter is a must have in your arsenal if you run power, because there is so much carry over between the schemes.  In counter, our Backside Guard (BSG) is the kick out man, now rather than skip pull he will take a very tight inside path to kick out the first color that shows, which is usually the play side DE.
This is all the same in every Counter we run.  Our variations come from who our 2nd puller is and who secures the back side.  Our 2nd puller is also called the “wrapper” because they will wrap inside of the guards kick out block to lead up on the play side LB.  If the opposing DE steps down to wrong arm our guard will drive this, logging the DE, and our 2nd puller and Rb have to read this and bounce around it.

Counter FB
We will use the FB as our second puller, this tells the BST to stay home and secure the back side.

Double Tight Counter
This is very similar to counter FB, but we run it from double tight, we use our BS TE as our 2nd puller since we don’t have a FB in the game.  This was a great play for us, the extra gap in double tight was great for us because it isn’t something you see much with so many teams spreading out on Offense.  Being in this balanced look up front also helped to stop teams from loading up one side to shut down Power.  We could line up the same and call the play either direction.  We miss a down block in this clip but it is a great example of our 2nd puller working down the field to spring us for a huge TD.

Super Counter
I didn’t run this scheme often but it had serious big play potential because we are aligned in a heavy formation to the strong side, but then pull 3 players to the weak side.  In super counter, we have 2 wrappers.  We pull both the FB, and the TE up through the hole to lead for the RB.

QB Counter
The last type of counter I want to describe is often called GT.  The T represents the BST acting as the 2nd puller and wrapping up to LB.  If we ran GT to our RB we would either block the BSDE with the FB, or have to read him.  In this example (my favorite play if you have an athletic QB) we use the RB to block back side and have the QB keep the ball.  This maximizes our blocking while being spread because we use the back as a blocker, and it provides some misdirection by faking to the back and going the other way.

In most cases if the defense is shutting down power, counter is wide open.

Power Variations #6 – Overload Power

One of my favorite ways to run our 2 back power is using unbalanced/overload formations.
We are stilling running our same 2 back power scheme, but we overload the defense by lining up unbalanced and getting an extra hat play side.  Most teams who use unbalanced bring a tackle over to where the TE usually plays.  This past season my TE was my best down blocker so we just covered him up.  I liked this because we still had 2 wide forcing the defense to walk someone out over the slot, but we were still running 2 back power to the TE side.
We had a few overload sets but the diagram below was the main one.

Overload

We had a lot of success using this formation running power.  In the clips below, both were done near the end of the game where we had to run the clock out to finish off the game, the type of situation where everyone knows you are running the ball.  The first clip is from a series where we ran overload 2 back power 5 consecutive plays, to march down the field, while running the clock out, and eventually scoring to end the game and beat our cross town rival.  They never adjusted to our overload and we kept pounding the ball.

Yes it sets us up in a very heavy formation to the strong side but i feel it makes play calling easy, it all comes back to numbers and seeing how they adjust.  We used this formation for some play action shots and if I felt they were loading up to the overload side, we could run power to the weak side.  The clip below is an example of weak side power away from the overload, it isn’t blocked great, we miss a down block, but we are able to punch it in.

 

The last example I am going to share of an overload set we used on the first play of the game in our 1st round playoff match up.  We still covered up the TE, but we removed our slot WR, and replaced him with our usual starting TE (best blocker) and lined him up in a wing position.  We are still running power but you will see him work inside and we get both him and our BSG through the hole. 70+ yards untouched is a great way to open the game.

 

Small adjustments like this are great wrinkles to mix in through out the season.  It just expands a base play by using another formation.  This can be difficult for a defense to line up to, especially if they haven’t seen it on film to prepare for it.  My only caution is to have something ready in the play action game, and back to the weak side, so you can take advantage when they over adjust to stop that strong side run.

 

Power Variations #5 – Super 1 back

Today’s power variation is simply combining two concepts I have already discussed.
From our double tight formation we would run 1 back power (because we don’t have a FB in, we are in 1 back) and I would add our super tag on to tell the back side TE to also pull.

Super 1 back power

 

Another way we can run super 1 back power, is to call our 1 back power scheme, but from 21 personnel.  Since our TE is the kick out guy in our 1 back power, the Fb is used as another insert player along with the back side pulling guard.
21 super 1 back power
Here is a clip of the play, we get good base blocks from our RT and TE, and a very good down block from our RG to open up the B gap.  Now we lead our FB and LG through the hole and our RB can get downhill behind them.

 

Tomorrow will be my final post in the Power Variations series, it will also be my 100th Post!
Tomorrow I will focus not a a new power scheme, but running power from unbalanced formations.

Power Variations #4 – Power Arc

Any well coached defense is going to have answers to try and shut down your base plays.  Most teams will try to stop POWER by coaching up their DEs to squeeze the down block and blow up the FB.

Power Arc is a great way to handle well coached DEs who do a great job with block down step down.

This is the simplest tweak we have in my opinion.  “Arc” simply tells our end man (could be the TE or the OT to the weakside) to Arc release instead of their usual down block.  They will open up wide, trying to clear the DE, and block the defenses force (OLB/SS depending on defense).

So while we are running power, that DE is seeing a reach block, the better coached the DE is the more effective this tag is.

 Power arc

In the clip below, the DE we are going against (#59) is an All Everything DE headed to BYU next year.  He is very well coached, and very difficult to run power against.  In this clip we use the Arc tag, he expands with our TE because the block looks like reach.  This gives our FB a much easier kick out block, and helps us run Power right at one of the best defensive players in Northern California.

 

Power Variations #3 – 1 Back Power

Standard power is a great play, BUT it requires you have a lead blocking back in the game.  I knew early on that POWER would be our best play, but wanted to be able to do it from different formations and not rely on HAVING to have our FB in the game.

So after we had some solid experience using our regular 2 back power (first half of summer worth of practice) I  installed our 1 back power.  We call it power base.  In power base, since we have no FB in, we use our TE to be the “kick out” guy.  The “base” tag tells our TE and play side tackle they will base/kick out on anyone head up or outside of them.

EVEN:
I include the play side Tackle in understanding this base tag.  If he doesn’t have a base block to execute he does his usual down block like every other time we run power.  Against a 4 man front, we often see a 3 tech (b gap DT) on the TE side, so our tackle would down block as usual.

 Power base even

ODD:
Against an odd front we most often see the play side DT lined up head up to outside of our OT so he would base block. We just about always see a defender lined up head up or outside of our TE and this is the player our TE will base block.

Power base odd

By simply adding the word “base” to the play call we are running our bread and butter power scheme and only changing the TE’s block, and the OT’s block against an odd front.

Here are a few clips of us running 1 back power.

 

Power Variations #2 – Super Power

The bread and butter of any Double Wing(DW) attack is Super Power.  Traditional Super Power is the same as the standard power I described yesterday (play side down blocks, with a FB kick out, and a back side guard wrap) but the SUPER in super power comes from adding an additional puller/wrapper.  Now usually, DW teams use guard and tackle as pullers and have TE cut block to stop backside pursuit of the play.

We pull on super power a little bit differently, we pull the backside TE as the second puller/wrapper. This gives us a few advantages, we are pulling a faster, more athletic kid who can get to the hole quicker and has better feet to be able to redirect to pick up a LB.  It also lets us keep our back side tackle home with his usual protect b gap and hinge.  This means no new teaching for our back side tackle, in fact ours has no idea what the difference is between power and super power.  Keeping the backside tackle at home and upright is a more powerful block and I feel does a better job at sealing off the back side than the TE cut block.

It is key for the BS TE to get depth on his pull, and re enter the LOS square.  Ideally, when the guard gets through the hole he looks head up to outside, and the TE looks head up to inside.

Now we didn’t do this from a DW set, we did it from our base 21 personnel pro pistol set.

I Twins Right super power

Here is some video of us running super power.  Please excuse 2 of the clips, our camera guy started a little bit late so you miss the very beginning but you can see us pull both BSG and BSTE through the hole.

Coming tomorrow, 1 back power!

POWER Variations Series

Now that the season is over, I can get back to some real writing.

Power is my favorite scheme in football.  I am a huge fan of the standard play side down blocks, with a backside guard pull up to LB.

I am also a big fan of some variations a coach can use to help the run Power scheme in different ways.

This post will be the first in a series of some of the different ways I have taken Power and made slight tweaks to get a TON of mileage out of one play.

Today I will focus on your standard 2 back Power.
2 Back Power is what we install first, and requires a FB or H back to be the “kick out” guy.
The play side OL all block their inside gap (we can work doubles if the defensive front allows it).

Our FB is our kick out guy and is responsible for getting his head inside of the EMLOS.
Our back side guard will execute a “Skip pull” and work through the first open hole he sees play side to attack the play side inside LB.
The back side tackle executes a B gap hinge, stepping to secure B gap pressure, then working back to stop backside chase.

Here are a few examples of our standard 2 back power.

You can read a very in depth article of my blocking rules, how I teach the blocks, and videos of drill work for the Power Scheme as part of A Coaching Arsenal.
My entire chapter focuses on OL play in the Power Scheme.
Some more information on this iBook is available here and here.
Links to ENTIRE Power Series posts here:

Naked Concept

I want to share an awesome play action concept that was one of our best plays this past season.

Our Naked Bootleg Concept

I’ve run bootlegs before. We did some last season from a 100% 4 wide environment. At my alma mater we ran a lot of bootleg off of our criss cross action. This year I would say the Naked concept was cleaned up some because of the great work of Coach Grabowski..
If you haven’t picked up his ibook yet, do yourself a favor and get it. There’s a ton of information there that heavily influenced what we did offensively this year. We only scratched the surface this year, I plan to include more of his concepts this upcoming season.

The core components of the Naked concept

A vertical play side route… We used both the “K Route” (an inside stemmed corner) and a Go route. The K route is great because that inside stem helps sell the run action better to the Corner, thus opening up space behind him. We ended up going to a Go route at the end of the season because our K routes were getting sloppy and we weren’t getting deep enough.

A deep drag or out route… from a slot or a TE.

A backside post with a hard inside stem to not out run QB’s arm

A flat/DE control route – this route is the most important in my opinion. It is his job to control that back side DE… it is “Naked” meaning OL is full run flow the other way. He has to take an angle at the DE so DE thinks he will be blocked. This flat route runner can’t be in a hurry to get out on his route. If the DE is up the field, he will lose his route and block the DE so the QB can set up and throw elsewhere. This was something we struggled with. We need to do a better job of picking this DE up to avoid costly sacks.

The flat route can come from anywhere. Same side, across the formation, from an H back… even a TE.

From the 21 personnel offset pistol we used last year it would look like this

Naked to the TE side. TE in this case would run the deep out. We are trying to get 15 yards deep.

  Naked rt 2

Here we have Naked going away from the TE. He now has the drag, trying to get behind LBs and be at the other hash at 15.

Naked rt 1

Here’s some film with my horrible voice over. Only thing holding back my rap career is the fact that my voice isn’t deep enough.

One thing you will notice from the pistol is the mesh mechanics we used. I got this from Coach Grabowski as well. It is a reverse pivot, followed by 2 steps vertical, looking back at the RB, with open hand extended. This he feels, is the best way to sell the play action. We fooled a lot of defenses, and quite often our own coaching staff (if they didn’t hear the play call).
I am contemplating whether or not I want to keep the reverse out next season. I agree it sells the play action better, hides the ball well, but I felt at times, especially if it wasn’t a great snap, it slowed the RB and the timing of the play down a little bit.

I want to leave you with one last concept off of naked. I put this in late in the year, I really thought we would hit it for a big play but never did. It is a wheel concept. It’s drawn up below from Twins, with the TE and FB still doing the same assignments. The major difference is that I have the X running a deep post with the Z running a wheel route. I hoped the Corner would follow the Post, opening up a home run to our wheel route but the corners stayed very disciplined.

I am thinking it might be better to send X on a GO route to remove him from the picture, and hit the wheel route trailing him.

I think it definitely had big play potential, and I will continue to play with what route configuration works best for us on it.

Naked wheel